1887

oa Molecular Diagnosis and Vaccines - Circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell profiles in pulmonary tuberculosis: association with disease activity and response to treatment

 

Abstract

The wide spectrum of clinical outcomes following infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is largely determined by the host immune response. This tudy assesses circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell profiles in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in relation to disease activity before and 2 months after the start of antituberculous chemotherapy. Two-colour Flow Cytometry was used for counting circulating T-cell subpopulations. Forty patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 10 age and sex matched normal controls were involved in this study. Patients were divided according to the severity of disease into 28 patients with minimal or moderate disease and 12 patients with severe extensive disease. Sputum and blood specimens were obtained at admission and 2 months after the start of treatment. Although, no significant differences in CD4+ T- cell counts (mean %) between normal controls and both patients with mild/moderate disease and with severe disease at admission and 2 months after the start of treatment (P>0.05) yet, significant differences were observed in CD8+ T-cell counts between normal controls and both patients with mild/moderate and severe disease at admission (40.78 8.60) and (46.16 6.01) respectively and 2 months after the start of treatment only in patients with severe disease (46.00 5.15) (P<0.001). At admission a significant difference (P<0.05) was observed between patients with mild/moderate and severe disease only in CD8+ T-cell counts while after 2 months of the start of treatment, there were significant differences in both CD4+ (48.78 8.87 and 43.16 6.22) and CD8+ (35.35 37.35 and 46.00 5.15) respectively. In conclusion, circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell profiles change with disease activity and drug efficacy. The study suggests the possible use of CD8+ T-cells in prediction of disease outcome and monitoring drug efficacy and may point out to the potential role of CD8+ T-cells in the development of a novel vaccine strategy against tuberculosis.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/mdv/1/1/AJA16872010_4
2003-01-01
2016-12-05
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error