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n African Journal of Psychiatry - Monitoring the prevalence ofmethamphetamine-related presentations at psychiatric hospitals in Cape Town, South Africa : original article

Volume 16, Issue 1
  • ISSN : 1994-8220
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Abstract

: This study aimed to determine a demographic profile of methamphetamine (MA)-related admissions to major psychiatric services in Cape Town, obtain a substance use profile from admitted patients, a profile of common MA-related symptoms encountered during the assessment of the patients presenting with MA-related problems, and a brief profile of the psychiatric diagnoses made.


: Staff in six psychiatric hospitals or wards in Cape Town collected data on methamphetamine related admissions between July and December 2008 using a one-page record review form. The data collection form consisted of the patient's demographic details, presenting symptoms, previous admission details, current MA and other substance use information, and DSM-IV diagnosis.
: A total of 235 forms were completed. Most patients were male (69%) and the mean age was 25 years. The most common presenting symptoms were aggressive behaviour (74%), followed by delusions (59%) and hallucinations (57%). Males were two times more likely to present with aggression as compared to females, while females were significantly more likely to present with depressed mood or euphoric/elevated mood. The majority of patients had substance induced psychotic disorder (41%), followed by schizophrenia (31%). Twelve percent (12%) had bipolar mood disorder.
: MA-related psychiatric admissions pose serious challenges to all health services dealing with these patients. Further training and treatment protocol development and distribution is indicated.

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/content/medjda2/16/1/EJC130536
2013-01-01
2017-03-25

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