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oa Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia - The role of coping responses in the relationship between perceived stress and satisfaction with life amongst chronic pain patients : original research

 

Abstract

This study aimed to determine the effect of coping responses on the relationship between perceived stress and satisfaction with life in a sample of chronic pain patients.


One hundred and seventy-two adult outpatients at the Pain Control Unit at Universitas Hospital in Bloemfontein completed measures of perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale), satisfaction with life (Satisfaction with Life Scale) and coping responses (Coping Responses Inventory - Adult Version). Descriptive statistics were calculated for the sample. Correlation coefficients were calculated between perceived stress and satisfaction with life. Regression analyses were employed to determine the effect of coping responses on the relationship between perceived stress and satisfaction with life.
A statistically significant negative correlation was found between perceived stress and satisfaction with life. Approach coping moderates the relationship between perceived stress and satisfaction with life, while avoidance coping has no effect on the relationship. The relationship between perceived stress and life satisfaction therefore appears to change as a function of the level of approach coping that patients with chronic pain exhibit.
Approach coping moderates the relationship between perceived stress and satisfaction with life amongst chronic pain patients.

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/content/medsajaa/16/5/EJC73801
2010-09-01
2016-12-07
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