1887

n African Renaissance - Beyond the last computer

Volume 6, Issue 1
  • ISSN : 1744-2532
  • E-ISSN: 2516-5305

Abstract

I felt the hard, cold steel of a gun against the back of my head. I spun around and saw my assailant's finger shaking on the trigger : "Don't run or I'll shoot you," he said. I was just 14 years old, and death was a stranger to me.


It was 1969, and Nigeria was embroiled in civil war. As a teenage refugee conscripted into the Biafran Army, I was forced at gunpoint to carry weapons to the Oguta front. It was a 24-hour, march through mosquito-infested mangroves flooded by the River Niger.
When the 30-month war ended on January 15, 1970, I was discharged and reunited with my parents. Together with one million returning refugees we walked for three days, avoiding landmines along fetid rainforest footpaths. Eventually, we reached our hometown of Onitsha. It was badly battered by the war.
There my thoughts returned to a love abandoned three years earlier - mathematical physics. This love affair blossomed when I was a refugee in Biafra, - shortly before July 20, 1969 - the day man first walked on the moon. While running an errand, I stopped to gaze through a classroom window and saw a physics lecturer writing on a blackboard. It was Newton's Second Law of Motion : "orce equals ass times cceleration, or ."

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/content/aa_afren/6/1/EJC10318
2009-01-01
2019-08-25

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