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n Cardiovascular Journal of Africa - Association of infection with the metabolic syndrome among HIV-infected black Africans receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy : cardiovascular topic

Volume 26, Issue 2
  • ISSN : 1995-1892
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Abstract

The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is common in human immune deficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Immune deficiencies caused by HIV give rise to numerous opportunistic gastrointestinal pathogens such as , the commonest cause of chronic gastritis. The study sought to determine the relationship between infection and the MetS among HIV-infected clinic attendees.


This cross-sectional study was carried out in a specialised heart clinic in Kinshasa, DR Congo. Between January 2004 and December 2008, 116 HIV-infected patients (61 with MetS and 55 without MetS) who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for dyspeptic symptoms were included in the study following an informed consent. Univariate associations were determined by odds ratios (OR), while multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with the MetS.
infection (OR = 13.5, 95% CI: 10.3-17.6; < 0.0001) and peripheral obesity (median hip circumference ≥ 97 cm) (OR = 4.7, 95% CI: 1.2-18.8; = 0.029) were identified as MetS-related factors in HIV-infected patients. Higher rates of the MetS were associated with increased incidence of HIV-related immunocompromise using World Health Organisation (WHO) staging criteria. There was a univariate significant difference in the prevalence of the MetS between antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naïve patients and patients treated by means of a first-line HAART regimen of stavudine (d4T), lamivudine (3TC) and nevirapine (NVP). However, this difference was not significant in multivariate logistic analysis.
infection was significantly associated with the MetS in HIV-infected patients.

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/content/cardio1/26/2/EJC169095
2015-03-01
2016-12-09

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