1887

n South African Medical Journal - Can fireworks-related injuries to children during festivities be prevented? : original articles

Volume 100, Issue 8
  • ISSN : 0256-9574
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Abstract

To determine the epidemiological features and outcome of fireworks-related injuries among children 0 - 13 years old.


A retrospective study from the trauma registry of a children's hospital from 2001 - 2009.
Fifty-five children were treated for injuries from fireworks. The mean age was 8.8 years, 78% were boys, and the largest age group was 5 - 9 years old. Firecrackers accounted for 95% of the injuries; the most commonly injured body sites were hands (44%), eyes (42%) and face (31%); 47% of the patients had more than one injury. The most common injury type was burns (67%); 25 children were admitted, mostly to the burns and ophthalmology units. The mean length of hospital stay was 3.5 days. Surgical intervention was required in 38% of the patients. Most of the fireworks accidents occurred in or around the patients' homes. There were more fireworks-related injuries around Guy Fawkes Day (85%) than New Year's Eve (9%).
Consumer fireworks cause serious but preventable injuries to children, either as users or bystanders. Children and their families should be encouraged to enjoy pyrotechnical displays conducted by professionals at designated areas. All fireworks for individual private use should either be supervised by an adult or banned. Current legislation should be more strictly enforced, especially the sale to under-age children.

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/content/m_samj/100/8/EJC67348
2010-08-01
2016-12-09

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